Examples Of A Thesis Statement For Compare And Contrast

Has this ever happened to you?

Professor: Where is your thesis statement?

Student:

If so, don’t worry. You’re not the first person to struggle with writing a thesis statement, and you won’t be the last. This part of essay writing has vexed many college students, but luckily, I’m here to show you the ropes.

Almost every college essay you write will require a thesis in one form or another. A compare and contrast essay is no exception.

In this post, I’ll walk you through the finer points of how to write a compare and contrast thesis statement and offer some pro tips and resources for tackling that essay like a boss.

Everything’s an Argument

Every time you sit down to write an essay, try to think of it like an argument. Yes. An argument. Always.

This is important because your thesis is the main argument—the main point—you’re trying to make in your essay.

It’s a claim you make about your topic. Then you spend the rest of the essay backing up that claim with examples, reasoning, and sometimes professional sources that reinforce this claim.

A compare and contrast essay doesn’t always require you to cite sources, though. So let’s just focus on what you can do to write a great thesis and, thus, a great essay.

Think about it this way—if someone handed you this list…

…you would probably wonder why the heck the person just did that. Similarly, your professor wants to see how well you can identify the relationship between two things.

If you write a strong thesis, then you’ll show your professor that your compare and contrast essay has a purpose.

The Compare and Contrast Thesis Statement: Prework

If you’re going to write a strong thesis, you’ll want to make sure you know your approach before going in. Here are some pro tips to help you get started.

Pro tip #1: 

Pick topics that interest you. It’s way easier to write about something you like or care about. Need some help with picking a topic? Check out this list of compare and contrast essay topics.

Pro tip #2: 

Once you have your topics, try saying the following aloud (and maybe when you’re by yourself so that people don’t look at you funny in the campus library):

“(Topic 1) and (Topic 2) have a lot in common. They also have some differences.”

Then pretend someone just replied with, “So what?”

Repeat this exercise as you write the essay. It will help you reinforce your thesis and make sure that the point you’re making is meaningful.

Every time you start a new paragraph and write a topic sentence that reinforces your thesis, pretend that you’re being asked “so what?” again. Work on answering that question as you continue writing the paragraph.

Example

You write:

Though eccentric, both Gandalf and Dumbledore resemble kind-hearted grandfatherly figures when they first appear in the Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter series, respectively.

Your friend says:

So what?

You could reply:

Both characters are powerful wizards capable of terrible destruction, but showing them as kind old men humanizes and establishes them as protagonists that the reader can root for rather than fear.

Writing like this makes your essay more meaningful. Keep asking and answering “so what?” and you’ll write a strong essay that keeps reinforcing the thesis.

The Right Tool for the Job

There’s no “one-size-fits-all” thesis that works for any essay. Just like you wouldn’t use a screwdriver to hammer a nail, you’re not going to use an argumentative essay thesis for your compare and contrast essay.

If you’re going to write a solid compare and contrast thesis statement, then you’ll need to make sure you understand the anatomy of this essay. Let’s break down the compare and contrast format, bit by bit, and see how the thesis applies to each part.

Keep in mind that it’s a good idea to settle on your topics before moving forward. It’ll help you visualize how the following can be applied specifically to your topics.

1. Your approach

There are a few common approaches you could take when writing a compare and contrast essay.

Comparing/contrasting two things in the same category that are different somehow.

  • Your house vs. a friend’s house
  • Your favorite coffee shop vs. Starbucks
  • Two types of cars

Comparing/contrasting two things that seem very different but actually have a lot in common.

  • Bats and bears (both are mammals and hibernate during the winter)
  • Pablo Picasso and Winston Churchill (both were painters)

Comparing/contrasting two things that appear the same but are actually very different.

  • Tim Burton’s Batman vs. Christopher Nolan’s Batman
  • Any movie and the book it’s based on

Applying the thesis:

Your thesis will be different depending on which approach you use. For example, if you were to compare/contrast two things that seem different, your thesis might look something like this:

While bats and bears appear to have little in common at first glance, they are remarkably similar.

And if you compared/contrasted two things that seem similar, your thesis might look like this:

While Batman is always depicted as the famous “Caped Crusader” in each Batman film, this character is wildly different depending on the film’s director.

Another pro tip: 

To create a stronger thesis, be specific! For a compare and contrast essay, use several of your main points in your thesis to show the reader where your argument is going.

While bats and bears appear to have little in common at first glance, they are remarkably similar in their species classification and hibernation habits.

2. Your method

A compare and contrast essay is usually written using one of two methods.

Method #1: Subject by subject

This method is almost like writing two smaller essays in one. One half of the body paragraphs would cover the first subject, and the other half would cover the second subject.

Thesis:

While Batman is depicted as the “Caped Crusader” in either film series, Tim Burton’s Batman of the 1990s is far more comical, wittier, and less intimidating than Christopher Nolan’s early-2000s version.

To support this thesis, you would break down the things that are different between these two “subjects,” one at a time.

Tim Burton’s Batman (first half of body):

  • Comical
  • Witty and less intimidating
  • The style reflects 1990s-era American culture.

Christopher Nolan’s Batman (second half of body):

  • Serious
  • Intimidating/fierce depiction
  • The style reflects early 2000s-era American culture.

Method #2: Point by point

This method allows you to break down your topics by each point of similarity or difference. For each body paragraph, you support the thesis by writing about each topic at the same time.

Let’s use the same thesis from above and see how this method is organized in defending that compare and contrast thesis statement:

  • The tone (comical vs. serious)
    • Tim Burton’s Batman
    • Christopher Nolan’s Batman
  • The character (witty vs. intimidating)
    • Tim Burton’s Batman
    • Christopher Nolan’s Batman
  • Time period effect on style
    • Tim Burton’s Batman
    • Christopher Nolan’s Batman

Either one of these methods can work for your compare and contrast essay. They’re both good structures to follow when trying to support your thesis.

And remember—the thesis is only as strong as the evidence that supports it, so choosing your method before you start writing is a good idea.

3. Know the process

By now, you’re probably starting to get a good idea of how you might put together this essay, but keep in mind that strong organization is key. It’s always smart to do the following steps before you even think of sitting down to type your first draft.

Brainstorm

I know, I know—this is just something your professor tells you to do. But it really works! Many students get frustrated when writing and switch topics halfway through because they didn’t work out what they really wanted during a good old-fashioned brainstorming sesh.

My advice: Grab a snack and a cup of coffee. Stare out the window. Let the ideas start flowing in, and think about what you might have to say about them. Jot down some notes. You’re off to a good start.

Need some help with brainstorming? Read 6 Prewriting Strategies to Get Your Essay Rolling.

Outline

Really? Another step? You bet! I’ve seen a lot of students get stuck by the second paragraph because they didn’t plan ahead. Trust me—outline each paragraph of your essay. It’ll be so much easier to actually write the essay if you’re following a roadmap you’ve made for yourself.

Need some more help with outlining? Read This Compare and Contrast Essay Outline Will Help You Beat Writer’s Block.

Don’t write the compare and contrast thesis statement…yet

That’s right. Unless you’re 100% certain of what you’re going to say, your thesis could change often as you write.

Instead, jot down a few ideas of what your thesis might be. Use these as a guide, but don’t sweat it if your thesis ends up being way different than what you had originally planned.

Try writing your body paragraphs first. These are the most important parts of your essay, and when you’ve finished a draft, you can look back and see which of your main points are the strongest.

A thesis should only be one to two sentences long, so you’ll have to consolidate your ideas into this short space—this one argument.

Did you know that Kibin has a neat tool that can help you build that thesis if you get stuck? Give it a try: Kibin Thesis Builder.

The intro and conclusion can be written after you’ve hammered out the body paragraphs. Just make sure you’re following the correct organization for essay writing:

  • Intro and thesis
  • Body paragraphs 1, 2, 3, etc.
  • Conclusion (restate thesis)

The Takeaway

Now that you know how to write a compare and contrast thesis statement, get ready to blow your professor out of the water with a rockin’ essay. Say it with me now: this essay is going to be awesome.

And it will be. Just make sure you focus on all we’ve covered in this post to get started, and you’ll do great!

  • The thesis is your main argument.
  • Choose a topic you’re interested in.
  • Answer “So what?”
  • Know your approach.
  • Subject by subject or point by point?
  • Brainstorm, outline, draft.

As a final bit of advice, if your professor gives you instructions for how to organize and write this essay, follow them as closely as possible. If these instructions are in a workbook, make sure you’ve read and understand them. Ask your professor for clarity if necessary.

Also make sure you read some good compare and contrast essay examples to familiarize yourself with this essay style.

And of course, when you’ve finished working on that first draft, Kibin editors are standing by to help you make it shine.

Psst... 98% of Kibin users report better grades! Get inspiration from over 500,000 example essays.

10 Good Examples Of Thesis Statements For A Compare And Contrast Essay

If you’ve been set this type of paper, you’ll need to know how to handle each part of its construction; and one of those parts is getting your thesis statement right!

It should come after the introduction and is usually just one sentence in the first paragraph of your first chapter. So, for something so short, it could be overlooked as not being as important as other parts of the paper. Well, don’t overlook it! In that short thesis statement should be contained your intention for the whole paper- so make sure you get it right!

A thesis statement should interpret the significance of the subject to be discussed. Simply, it informs the reader of the expectations they can have for the rest of the essay; it is the argument for the forthcoming thesis.

Here are 10 good examples:

  • Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream contrasts the fairies and the mortals’ perception of, and boundaries of, reality, which is furthered by the play within a play.
  • Although Egyptian and South American pyramids differed greatly in many respects, as with their exterior and interior construction techniques, they also had many striking similarities; most obviously, they were made by two geographically different peoples who had no contact with one another according to official history.
  • There are an incredible amount of similarities between the stories of the movies Dances With Wolves and Avatar, with plenty of reason to think this is not accidental.
  • When comparing and contrasting the Republicans and Democrats, it seems as though they have so much more in common than not.
  • With Richard Dawkins and others promoting atheism these days, there are many atheists who have uncanny similarities with Christian preachers.
  • Seeing as Judaism, Christianity and Islam all stem from the same Abrahamic religion, and therefore they all technically worship the same god, are there enough differences between them to keep them opposed?
  • How exactly does Milton’s Paradise Lost differ to Genesis of the Bible, and due to many factors (such as having a single author) does Milton’s work actually contain more wisdom than the other?
  • With quantum physics discovering what many would claim as old mystical truths, let’s examine just how many similarities can be seen in the spiritual and scientific worlds.
  • Manet’s Olympia painting obviously has many similarities to the Titian’s original (the Venus of Urbino) and there are plenty of apparent contrasts in its artistic perception, but what of the public’s perception to such paintings at different points in time?
  • With so many obelisks placed in major cities around the world, are there enough similarities in their placement to give weight to ancient ley line theories?
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