Womens Rights Essays

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How to Write an Essay on Women Rights

Women rights are the entitlements claimed for women and girls in the society. These rights go beyond the right to vote or even own property. For the past years women have been struggling to be considered individuals in their own right, defined by their own terms and by their own intellect and accomplishments, not their gender. They have fought to be accorded the same respect as their male counterparts politically, legally, in the office, in education opportunities and even in their own families. This struggle did not start yesterday. A woman is a symbol of love, independence, care and emotional intensity, be it love or hate. That is why any issue involving her is very sensitive and must be handled critically including how to write an essay on women rights.

How to start an essay on women’s rights

An essay on women rights has to be written based on facts because it is something that has, is and will still affect the world in one way or another. The introduction of this essay has to grab the audience’s attention fully. Start with startling facts, either a statistical finding or a statement about women. It does not have to be new to your readers and can even be put in form of a question then add a sentence or two to elaborate. An example of such could be, “Did you know that American women who were jailed for demonstrating for the right to vote were force fed in prisons when they went for hunger strikes?” (WHMN, 2007) This question is enough to make your audience want to know more of what you are talking about. A few sentences explaining the topic in general terms can also act as an introduction as it gently leads your audience to your thesis statement. Definitions of key words like woman, rights and women rights in general come in handy. A brief overview on women rights, the struggle and how the society portrays women also contribute to a detailed introduction. The thesis statement should fall in the last line so that the ideas in the following paragraphs can flow based on it. An example of a thesis statement is, “women’s lives have drastically changed from having almost no freedom in the past to having a say in society today.”

How to write body for an essay on women’s rights

In order to have a free flow of ideas, a rough draft of the main points to be discussed in each paragraph has to be made. The body’s paragraphs have the same structure. Start by writing down the first point of your discussion in sentence form. This forms the topic sentence which is the basis of the paragraph. If your main idea is “religious perspective of women rights” then you can begin your paragraph by saying “women are viewed as God’s special gift to man”. Supporting statements should come thereafter with very clear and convincing elaborations. In this case, for example, quoted Bible or Quran verses can act as supporting statements that you can elaborate with your own words in three to five sentences. Correct use quotes and anecdotes appeals more to the hearts of the audience.  If you wish, include a summary statement at the end of the discussion.

How to conclude an essay on women’s rights

The conclusion brings closure to the reader by summing up all the points discussed. It also provides a final perspective on the topic.  Consider beginning your conclusion with a lead- in phrase but avoid the over used, clichéd and stiff terms like, “in conclusion” and “in closing”. All the main points discussed in the body are to be summarized in the last paragraph. The points, however, should be rephrased and not written word for word. Reintroduce the thesis statement in different words even if it’s only in passing. Remember, your thesis is your main point of discussion. Be authoritative, stand your ground undoubtedly. Fight for women rights passionately. Appeal to your audience’s emotions. Let your voice be heard clearly through your words. Avoid uncertain language like “I think” or “I am not so sure but” in your writing. Women’s rights are real issues, full of factual information and statistics. Do not apologize for your great ideas on women rights or use heavily- qualifying language. This is an issue that affects the whole world. If need be include a call to action. Convince people to change how they view women. Make them appreciate their role in their lives and in the society at large. All in all, the essay conclusion has to be short and straight to the point.

Outline Sample

An outline is a blueprint for your essay. With it, you can easily organize your thoughts. The outline page must include the title which is Women rights, the thesis statement, major points indicated by roman numerals and supporting statements indicated by capital letters. The first Roman numeral is the introduction and the last one is the conclusion. Below is a sample outline for an essay on women rights.

Introduction

  • Start with facts and figures explaining women rights in detail
  • Start with startling facts, either a statistical finding or a statement about women.
  • You may also quote a notable figure inn history who championed for women rights.
  • Come up with a catchy thesis statement that attracts your readers’ attention.

Body paragraphs

  • Start with relevant topic sentences
  • Following the topic sentences, are supportive sentences that should have detailed arguments supporting women’s rights.
  • Correct use quotes and anecdotes appeals more to the hearts of the audience
  • If you wish, include a summary statement at the end of every discussion.

Conclusion

  • This is a summary of the main ideas and arguments discussed.
  • Be sure to include recommendations on how women rights can be upheld.

Women’s rights essay

The issue regarding women’s rights is not a new one. In the past, there were distinctive differences between men and women, between their roles in society and their models of behavior. However, considerable changes have been found since those times. Today gender roles have been shifted, making strong impact on society. Women in the Western culture are now no more satisfied with the role of a homemaker; they prefer to make their own careers and share the same rights with men (Howie, 2010).  This fact means women’s rights are based on freedom that can be viewed as a virtue, but not as a burden. Women continue to fight for their rights. The emergence of feminist movements and ideologies united under the title of feminism (Gillis & Hollows, 2008). Today, there is a continuous discourse on the behalf of both opponents and proponents of feminism, but the main thing is to understand the very roots and reasons of the phenomenon (Gillis et al., 2007). Therefore, the major goal of this study is to find out the objective state of the problem and conclude whether women do win by acquiring the equal status with men in human society. For that end, the existing literature covering different perspectives will be analyzed. In particular, the study will be focused on proto-feminist movements in Europe of the 19-the century; passing the Representation of the People Act in 1918; demonstrations on women’s suffrage; women’s efforts during the First World War and the Second World War; the first wave, the second wave and the third wave feminism on the whole. The research is expected to prove that although social reconstruction of sex and gender is not always beneficial neither for women nor for men, the struggle for equal opportunities has become a historically determined stage of social development. These events reflect the changes in feminist movements and help to better understand the successes and failures of women in fighting for their rights. The impact of each event or development that will be discussed in this paper is connected with the changing role of women and with their changing opportunities in achievement of the established goals. Thesis statement: Women’s role in the struggle for equal opportunities highlights the positive effects of feminism on the social reconstruction of sex and gender that was caused by a number of important historical events and developments, such as the development of proto-feminist movements in Europe of the 19-the century; passing the Representation of the People Act in 1918; demonstrations on women’s suffrage; women’s efforts during the First World War and the Second World War; the development of the first wave, the second wave and the third wave feminism.

The major goal of this paper is to review the historical events and developments which involve women from 1865 to the present. This paper will explore six specific events or developments that span the years covered by this course, based on their impact on the topic “women’s role in history”.  The research is focused on the analysis of both European Women’s rights and the women’s rights movements launched in the U.S, defined as the first wave, the second wave and the third wave feminism.

Proto-feminist movements in Europe of the 19-the century

The development of proto-feminist movements in Europe of the 19-the century played an important role in the promotion of the philosophy of feminism. Women were inspired by proto-feminist concerns that women should be equal to men. Proto-feminist movements contributed to women’s achievements in different spheres of human activity. Actually, in the 19-th century, women’s condition under the law differed from that of men. In economics and politics, women had no power. However, women’s consciousness was more progressive compared with that of women who lived earlier than the 19-tyh century (Worell, 2000). In other words, the development of proto-feminist movements is connected with the development of feminist consciousness focused on the expansion of women’s rights and development of women’s rights movements. The Female Moral Reform Society is an example of effective proto-feminist movement aimed at representation women in a powerful position, placing emphasis on the public advocacy of personal ethics (Gillis & Hollows, 2008; Worell, 2000).

Passing the Representation of the People Act in 1918

The Representation of the People Act (1918) criticized the limited rights of women and continued to call for equal rights. This act provided an opportunity to establish fair relationships between men and women, promoting the idea of equal pay for equal work. New reforms of the 1900s contributed to the growth of feminism. According to the Representation of the People Act of 1918, all women included in the local governmental register, aged 30 and over, were enfranchised (Gillis & Hollows, 2008; Worell, 2000). The right to vote was granted to women who were householders, the householders’ wives, and who occupied the property with an annual rent of L5 and more, and who were the graduates of British universities (Gillis & Hollows, 2008).

Moreover, the debate regarding the passage of the Representation of the People Act raised the issues about the effects of the law, but it failed to change the established culture of parliamentary politics. Many women politicians did not criticize male-dominated political parties, remaining loyal to men’s power (Early video on the emancipation of women, 1930). In the 1900s, men remained in the positions of power, although the political movement regarding women’s suffrage in the U.K. began before the WWI (Worell, 2000).

 Demonstrations on women’s suffrage

            Many demonstrations were organized to address women’s suffrage rights. The first demonstration was the parade organized by Blatch in New York in 1910. Harriot Stanton Blatch was one of activists who promoted the idea of bringing a new suffrage bill, which could become the first step to women’s voting rights. In 1907, she established the Equality League of Self-Supporting Women. In 1913, the suffrage match was held in Washington D.C. More than 5000 women activist took part in this match, hoping to win public support for suffrage. In 1916, the Women’s Political Union organized many demonstrations on women’s suffrage. In the U.S., President Wilson agreed to support the idea of women’s suffrage in 1918 after numerous protests organized by feminists. As a result, women’s rights activists were aimed at equality in all spheres of human activity based on women’s suffrage. In 1919, the Nineteenth Amendment was passed by the U.S. Congress (Howie, 2010; Worell, 2000).

 Women’s efforts during the First World War

            Women’s role during the First World War reflected their social and economic position. Feminists were not satisfied with the idea that women’s work was classified as less important than men’s work. Besides, the working class women who were the representatives of the first wave feminism promoted the ideas of feminism at work and in homes, in stores, halls and local newspapers. They believed in their rights and were focused on the promotion of collective actions aimed at realization of their agenda. However, men opposed women’s involvement into male jobs during the First World War. Male trade unions defended the division of labor based on gender (Gillis & Hollows, 2008).

            Finally, women’s activism in the era of the First World War, the considerable increases in the cost of living in that period, as well as the recognition of the established trade unions and the passage of the constitutional amendment to support women’s suffrage contributed to women’s mobilization during the war. According to Howie (2010), patriotic women highlighted the importance of the ideas of feminism. Due to the diversity of experiences during that period, women could become more independent in their choices. Although many women realized that their rights were limited, they supported feminism and motivated others to join wartime mobilization (Howie, 2010).

Women’s efforts during the Second World War

            Women’s efforts during the Second World War were focused on more radical changes. Unlike in the First World War, during the Second World War women’s position was more stable. The governments allowed women to join the armed forces and be involved in the war-related production.  All women aged under 40 years old were divided into two categories: mobile and immobile. Mobile women were allowed to join army and carry out war work duties. Immobile women were responsible for caring children and elderly people. Many of them were involved in voluntary work, either in industry or in voluntary organizations (Howie, 2010).  Women were allowed to work 16 hours a day and perform men’s duties. However, women were paid less than men. Besides, they were discriminated in the workplace. Thus, women played an important role in the war effort, although their position in society was still less valuable, comparing with men’s position (Howie, 2010; Gillis & Hollows, 2008).

 The first wave, the second wave and the third wave feminism

            As the American women’s movement is characterizes as “waves”, there is a necessity to refer to three waves of feminism and identify certain differences between them. Actually, the development of the first wave, the second wave and the third wave feminism highlight the importance of women’s involvement in social reconstruction of sex and gender (Howie, 2010). Although these waves are closely connected with one another, there are some differences in their philosophies. It has been found that each wave of feminism is based on the successes and failures of previous generations of women. For example, the first wave feminism is reflected by the following successes: suffrage and voting rights. These developments occurred in the late 1800s- the early 1900s, influencing further changes in women’s representation (MacKinnon, 1995).

            In addition, the second wave feminism, which was launched in the 1960s, placed emphasis on the role of personal politics in human society. The banner of the second wave feminism was “the personal is political”. Actually, it was based on women’s rights, such as abortion rights, child care rights, as well as other issues, including women’s recognition of unpaid labor, access to health care services and equal pay for equal work. Catharine MacKinnon, the Professor of Law at the University of Michigan and the author of the book Toward a Feminist Theory of the State, argues that women’s rights are still limited and there is a necessity for broader horizons for women. A variety of issues of concern remain unsolved. Women continue to fight for their rights (MacKinnon, 1995). According to Hollows, and Moseley (2006), there is a close relationship between the second wave feminism and popular culture, but feminism cannot be viewed as a “monolithic and homogeneous movement” (p. 3).

            Moreover, the first wave and the second wave feminism created certain challenges, such as the concerns about racism and discrimination, tensions between generations, etc. These concerns can be found in the next wave of feminism – the third wave feminism, which was launched in the 1990s (MacKinnon, 1995). The third wave feminism is based on criticism of collective past of women’s movement and building more diverse and dynamic movement. In other word it is characterized by the increased role of multiculturalism (MacKinnon, 1995). Alice Walker (1983) helps to assess the role of virtues, beliefs and values in the creation of a womanist virtue ethic, which forms the basis of third wave feminism. She states that social activism helps in promotion of feminist ideas and addresses the challenges caused by diverse society.

Conclusion

            Thus, it is necessary to conclude that women have always played an important role in the development of history.  This paper is based on providing evidence regarding the effects of social reconstruction of sex and gender on women and their participation in the struggle for equal opportunities, which has become a historically determined stage of social development. The history that involves women has been developed over centuries, constantly changing its goals and forms, increasing the popularity of women’s movement, mainly in the 20-th century, when suffrage and voting rights were popularized. The role of women in the 19-th century differed from their roles in the 20-th century. The events that occurred in the 1900s contributed to the developments in the later decades. For example, proto-feminist movements in Europe of the 19-the century contributed to the development of more independent views on women’s rights and duties. The third wave feminism completely changes women’s views on their role in social development through the relationship between feminist movement and popular culture. Generally speaking, women’s role in the struggle for equal opportunities throughput the history emphasizes the positive effects of feminist ideas on the social reconstruction of sex and gender that was caused by a number of important historical developments, including the development of proto-feminist movements in Europe of the 19-the century; passing the Representation of the People Act in 1918; demonstrations on women’s suffrage; women’s efforts during the First World War and the Second World War; the development of the first wave, the second wave and the third wave feminism.

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